That’s how I think of the classroom I’m teaching in: “a pro-technology no-technology zone.” It is a place where we deliberately put aside social media and personal electronic devices (I don’t even bring my smartphone) and concentrate on learning economics. Then, when we go back on the grid, we’re empowered to think analytically rather than dashing from tweet to tweet.

If you don’t believe that staying continuously “on” with electronic devices reduces learning, just check the following references:

. . . and check your intuition on a couple of points. When you’re in a learning environment, do you stay focused on the subject at hand if you have a laptop or smartphone continuously on and in view? And, if the person next to you is checking Facebook or Twitter, how does that affect your concentration?

 

A pro-technology no-technology zone